Join | Login

Most recent

  • 3.75

    Some words are often confused by language learners – because they are similar to another word or because they look like a word in your own language but have a different meaning. 

  • 4

    Wish and ‘If only’ are both used to talk about regrets – things that we would like to change either about the past or the present.

  • 3.2

    When one verb is followed by another, the second verb can either be an infinitive or an –ing form. Some verbs can be followed by either an infinitive, or an –ing form but with a change in meaning. 

  • 4

    When one verb is followed by another, the second verb can either be an infinitive or an –ing form.

  • 3.5

    Some verbs are usually followed by prepositions before the object of the verb. these are called dependent prepositions and they are followed by a noun or a gerund (‘ing’ form).

Most popular

  • 5
  • 5

    The present perfect tense has a number of uses.

  • 5

    We use both present perfect tenses to talk about things where there is a connection between the past and the present.

  • 5

    Relative clauses add extra information to a sentence by defining a noun. They are usually divided into two types – defining relative clauses and non-defining relative clauses.

  • 5

    When we report what people say, we usually change the tense of the verbs to reflect that we are reporting – not giving direct speech. This pattern is followed when we report questions. 

A - Z list

  • 4

    When we use several adjectives together, we must decide the order to put them in.

  • 3.25

    Adjectives can be either gradable or non-gradable.

  • 2.5

    Some adjectives go with certain prepositions. There is no real pattern – you need to learn them as you meet them. 

  • 2.666665

    Adjectives that end ‘-ed’ (e.g. ‘bored’, ‘interested’) and adjectives that end ‘-ing’ (e.g. ‘boring’, ‘interesting’) are often confused.

  • 2.666665

    Adverbs of frequency tell how often something happens.