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Policy - national

Read about UK policies relating to ESOL and integration, as well as information about current policy.  You will also find commentary and opinion on policy from a range of sources.

Most recent

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    Scott Blinder, Martin Ruhs, and Carlos Vargas-Silva

    The Migration Observatory (2011)

    For half a century opinion polls have consistently shown that the public in Britain favours a reduction in immigration. But answers to basic questions about people’s preferences for reducing, increasing or maintaining prevailing levels of immigration provide only a very partial understanding of the British population’s views on this issue. This report aims to address two key issues: first, who do people have in mind when thinking and answering questions about “immigrants”? Second, do people’s views about reducing, increasing or maintaining the number of immigrants coming to the UK vary across specific groups of immigrants?

     

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    Scott Blinder, Rob McNeil, Martin Ruhs and Carlos Varga-Silva

    The Migration Observatory, 2012

    The impact of immigration on population growth has become one of the most prevalent themes in political and media debates on UK immigration policy. This report was produced to inform policy makers ahead of a parliamentary debate in September 2012. The debate was triggered by an e-petition calling for the government to take “all necessary steps” to reduce immigration to levels that would stabilise the UK population below 70 million. The report looks in detail at key numbers and issues and at the trade-offs associated with the deep cuts to net migration that a 70 million population limit would require.

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    William Allen and Scott Blinder

    The Migration Observatory, 2013

    The report aims to provide both useful insights into the language used and the ways that different types of newspaper approach the subject of immigration, and to provide a bed of evidence for further social science investigations into the subject of migration in the media. It capitalises on new methods for analysing what is commonly known as “big data” and provides a quantitative analysis of the language used by all 20 of Britain’s main national daily and Sunday newspapers, covering all news stories, letters and other published content dealing with migrants and migration over three years from 2010 to 2012. 

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    Scott Blinder, Martin Ruhs and Carlos Vargas-Silva

    The Migration Observatory, 2011

    The aim of this report is to inform and promote a stronger evidence base for debate, not to say what policy should be.  It sets out the ten most important problems in the evidence base on immigration and migrants in the UK. What to include in the list has been guided by the key issues in current public and policy debates on migration. These include the mechanics and impacts of reducing overall net-migration to the tens of thousands through limiting non-EU immigration for work, study and family/marriage reasons, and through making it more difficult for migrants to settle permanently in the UK. The top ten data and analysis problems discussed in this report are all relevant to these issues.  

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    Asset Skills (2007)

    Migrant labour is a significant part of many sectors in the UK economy and most cleaning companies believe their industry is now almost wholly reliant on migrant labour. This report establishes a knowledge base for migrant workers in the English cleaning industry and examines their role and importance in the sector. An important issue is the need for migrant workers to have basic language skills and who should pay for ESOL provision.  The language barrier, particularly the lack of spoken English, appears to be the only significant limitation to the role of migrant workers in this sector.

Most popular

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    Welsh assembly Government and NIACE Dysgu Cymru

    (March 2009)

    This study investigated innovative and effective approaches used by the voluntary sector to deliver ESOL to reach marginalised and excluded groups and individuals in Wales

     

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    Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (2011)

    This Equality Impact Assessment examines the potential effects on adult learners participating in English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) courses as a result of changes to policy concerning eligibility criteria for fee remission as set out within wider funding and structural reforms in Skills for Sustainable Growth and 

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    Alison Wolf (Department for Education: 2011)
     

    This document reviews the provision for vocational training for 14-19 year-olds.  One of its key recommendations is that ‘post-16, English and Mathematics should be a required component of study programmes for those without good GCSEs in these subjects’.

     

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    CBI-EDI Survey of Employers (2011)

    According to this CBI-EDI Education and Skills Survey, almost half of employers report problems with literacy, numeracy and employability skills in the workforce.   Chapter 5 sets out the evidence for the need to improve these skills.  In addition, the report identifies two other areas for development, the need for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) and foreign-language skills in chapters 9 and 12 respectively.  While the report does not reflect on second language speakers and the contributions that they make to UK commerce and industry, the latter two areas are particular strengths for the EAL & ESOL target groups.

     

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    E. and A.  Williams for CfBT Education Trust (2007)

    The report provides an overview of provision of English language teaching in the ESOL and EFL sectors and recommends the two should be amalgamated. 

     

A - Z list

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    Jill Rutter
    Institute for Public Policy Research (2013)
     
    The report looks at migration routes and other demographic features, explores definitions of integration – including its relationship to social cohesion – reviews 100 years of British integration/immigration policy and examines the evidence of migrants’ experiences of integration in the labour market, in education and in the communities in which they live. It also makes suggestions for the future direction of government policy on integration, including English language provision
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    Scott Blinder, Rob McNeil, Martin Ruhs and Carlos Varga-Silva

    The Migration Observatory, 2012

    The impact of immigration on population growth has become one of the most prevalent themes in political and media debates on UK immigration policy. This report was produced to inform policy makers ahead of a parliamentary debate in September 2012. The debate was triggered by an e-petition calling for the government to take “all necessary steps” to reduce immigration to levels that would stabilise the UK population below 70 million. The report looks in detail at key numbers and issues and at the trade-offs associated with the deep cuts to net migration that a 70 million population limit would require.

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    CBI-EDI Survey of Employers (2011)

    According to this CBI-EDI Education and Skills Survey, almost half of employers report problems with literacy, numeracy and employability skills in the workforce.   Chapter 5 sets out the evidence for the need to improve these skills.  In addition, the report identifies two other areas for development, the need for STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) and foreign-language skills in chapters 9 and 12 respectively.  While the report does not reflect on second language speakers and the contributions that they make to UK commerce and industry, the latter two areas are particular strengths for the EAL & ESOL target groups.

     

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    Department for Communities and Local Government

    (2012)

    The Coalition Government’s approach to integration in England, which outlines a range of actions and funding streams, including additional funding to support English language provision for those adults who are not in employment or actively seeking employment and are unable to afford fees. It acknowledges the need to support those who have little or no English, a high proportion of whom are women with children living in areas already facing significant integration challenges.

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    Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (2011)

    This Equality Impact Assessment examines the potential effects on adult learners participating in English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) courses as a result of changes to policy concerning eligibility criteria for fee remission as set out within wider funding and structural reforms in Skills for Sustainable Growth and